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The World Cup Tournament Format


Asha Pabla has worked as a fashion designer and manager in the textile and fabric industry for most of her professional career. An avid traveler, Asha Pabla has visited global destinations such as Europe, Sri Lanka, Barbados, and India. She also traveled to Brazil for the World Cup.

The World Cup, sponsored by the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), is a professional soccer tournament and the largest single sporting event in the world. FIFA, an international association based in Zurich, was founded in 1904 and works to administer and improve the professional sport of soccer. 

Founded in 1930 and held every four years, the World Cup pits teams from 208 members of the FIFA organization in a global competition. The format of the tournament includes a series of preliminary events, which take place over the course of three years. During these preliminary matches, teams compete to qualify for 32 spots in the World Cup tournament finals, which includes 31 at-large spots and one spot reserved for the host nation. The finals, which are referred to as the final competition, take place in a single host country over the course of a month.

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